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Game Dota2 Sucking Them Dry: Dota wants star rookies, but doesn’t know how to develop them

Game Dota2 Sucking Them Dry: Dota wants star rookies, but doesn’t know how to develop them

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Dota is the Ayn Rand of esports. Compared to CS:GO or League of Legends, it can be brutally Darwinistic; in other titles, teams that fall short of a top international finish can survive on sticker sales or salaries while they improve, but in Dota, every player’s survival depends exclusively on their team's performance, with little room for error.

The first-or-last mentality this promotes puts immense pressure on players to find every advantage. For some it can be a source of motivation, but there’s no question it also puts a strain on relationships between teammates. When push comes to shove, a player’s own survival comes before that of their team. As Arteezy said on stream in January of last year, "You have to be selfish in what you do to be successful. If that means breaking friendships, or potentially breaking friendships or f***ing up people to get what you want, it's worth it. It's a depressing reality, but you got to do what you got to do." That stream was later deleted.

Since the very beginning, The International has been a the creator and the destroyer, suturing players together on the inhale and blowing apart the global competitive scene on the exhale. After The International 2011, esports’ first million-dollar event, all but two teams had major roster changes, and that pattern has continued in every year since.

That said, the nature of shuffles changed drastically this 2016 season. TI’s ever-growing prize pool and Valve's roster locks weigh heavily on teams, and there's good reason to believe that many of them will fracture in the coming weeks.

Shuffles of the Past

Back in 2011, the post-TI roster shuffle was spread out over the fall season, but as the years have progressed, the period of breakup and reformation has become shorter and more immediate. Valve made this trend an official policy last year when they introduced the Major roster lock system, which gave teams approximately one month after TI to figure things out before they had to sign up for the next Major.

Early on, teams tended to disband completely after mixed results at The International. Seven rosters disbanded after TI1, and the same number disbanded the next year. In 2013, both The International and third-party tournament earnings spiked thanks to the introduction of crowdfunding. At that year's TI, half the rosters attending broke up in the aftermath. In spite of how popular disbanding was, players still tended to cling to past teammates; by early 2014, NewBee had risen from the ashes of TongFu, Titan from the ashes of Orange, and many other players from disbanding teams were joining squads with one or two players they'd played alongside in the past.

Today, by contrast, organizations have become much more stable, and drafting players has become increasingly important. Rather than disband altogether, teams have tended to swap out the majority of their players and build new rosters around one or two defining stars. Meanwhile, players on major teams have had more incentive to stay until they get a better offer, and the growing prevalence of long-term contracts has made transfers more difficult.

Saahil "Universe" Arora was a focus of the spring 2016 shuffle

The International 2014 was the first year where nearly every roster at The International had players change, at least two per team by Spring of the following year. Although this was the first year of true worldwide roster instability, it was also the year with the fewest fully disbanded teams — especially considering four of the six disbanding teams were qualified rather than invited, and three of those had only been sponsored because they had qualified.

In 2015, the trend continued. Evil Geniuses became the first team to kick a player after winning The International — the first team to kick a player after winning any major Dota 2 tournament, in fact. That paved the way for Team Secret to swap out two of their players after convincingly winning The Shanghai Major. Now, after TI6, it’s not clear that anyone is safe; Fnatic, who finished a comfortable Top 4, have already lost one of their players, and all eyes are on second-place finisher Digital Chaos, a small-time NA team suddenly full of desirable star players.

Perspectives on Change

There are two competing priorities in professional Dota: stability and adaptation. Different philosophies have developed around each. According to the latter, it's important for players to be exposed to fresh perspectives and different approaches to the game, and this is most often accomplished by bringing in new team members.

The trepidation is that a team that stays together too long will get stale and fall behind an ever-shifting metagame; that the players will get comfortable and even lazy without the need to constantly prove themselves. This perspective finds evidence in teams like Alliance, who stagnated after winning TI3 but returned to increased success after its players split up for a season and came back with fresh insight on the game.

Yet, from the viewpoint of stability, constantly changing a squad gives the players no time to become comfortable with each other's play habits, and robs them of the chance to develop synergy and improve over time. And this season at least, stability seems to have paid out much larger dividends than adaptation. Wings Gaming have been the most stable team in China over the course of their ascent to become TI’s champions this year. OG and Liquid have had the most stable rosters in Europe since TI5, and although those teams didn't fare particularly well at TI6, OG won two Majors and Liquid placed in the Top 2 at Shanghai and Manila.

Wings Gaming at The Manila Major

The introduction of coaches, substitutes and data analysts is one way these teams have been able to infuse fresh perspectives without changing rosters — for example, OG hired Sébastien "7ckingMad" Debs to help them reinvigorate their game after a downturn last winter. Meanwhile, teams that tried to solve their problems by shaking up their rosters, like Team Secret or Vici Gaming, have often struggled to find success.

At The International, I discussed the issue of stability with as many players and coaches as would discuss it, and no two had the same perspective. Escape Gaming coach Benjamin "Notahax" Läärä told me that if a roster can't commit to playing together for at least six months, there's no point in playing together at all. OG's captain Tal "Fly" Aizik said, "If people are not going to be motivated, they're not going to set a new goal for themselves, you're going to get worse. It's just how it is.” He later added, "It's very important to look at a goal and have that in mind."

RELATED: Fly on maintaining OG's winning mentality: '[We] can't afford to be not as hungry as the other teams'

Though there are only two Majors expected in the 2016-17 season, it is not known when and how long rosters will be locked next year. Given the instability that shook up the scene in the middle of the six-month lock that bridged The Manila Major and TI6 this year, it’s no longer clear that Valve will be able to enforce its roster locks as The International 2017 approaches.

Kurtis "Aui_2000" Ling told the Defense of the Patience podcast that after his experiences with Digital Chaos, he thinks teams are better off risking the open qualifiers than committing to a roster of uncertain quality too fast. From the perspective of Evil Geniuses — who despite breaking the Manila roster lock finished third at TI and went home with $2.2 million — it’s hard to argue that shuffling their roster and facing the open qualifiers was a bad choice. If this year showed us anything, it’s that roster locks that are too long or too rigid can end up increasing instability in the scene rather than ensuring it.

The Pending Shuffle

That lands us in the here and now. With Valve’s new roster lock policy, which breaks up the fall registration deadline into two separate “drop” and “add” dates, teams have more freedom to make necessary changes ahead of the Major. The new rules should play more into teams’ natural roster patterns.

Jacky "EternalEnvy" Mao was one of the first casualties of the post-TI6 shuffle

Between 2012 and 2015, several seasonal shuffles have developed on their own as teams have followed the rhythm of tournament trial and error. There’s a fall shuffle after The International, followed by a minor shuffle for underperforming teams between November and December. A second major shuffle usually occurs worldwide in January and February, with another fine-tuning shuffle between March and April. Teams have tended to stop tuning their rosters in the late Spring, when TI invites go out.

The roster lock system tried to shove all of that into a few frenzied weeks a few times a year, making squads commit before playing events with each other. The new two-Major system may still do this, but at least two Majors instead of three will align Valve’s roster locks more closely with the natural “off-season” periods in the fall and new year. It may decrease the likelihood of a messy post-lock Spring shuffle like we saw this year.

Rumors of the post-TI6 shuffle were already flying before the event ended. We knew contracts would expire for MVP Phoenix. We’ve seen key players like Secret’s EternalEnvy, Fnatic’s DJ and LGD’s Aggressif dropped from rosters on the new version of Valve’s registration page, though there's only speculation as to where they’re going. Many of SEA’s top teams, including TI Top 6 finisher TNC Gaming, have already dissolved. We’ve heard speculation that Alliance, OG and Liquid will all be joining the shuffle, and that China will see a repeat of the post-Shanghai shakeup as major players take the opportunity to retire.

RELATED: Hao's departure signals a changing of the guard for China​

The pressure on teams hasn't yet hit full-tilt. Though TI6 is fading in the distance, Valve has only just announced its new registration rules, and we don’t yet know when the fall Major or qualifiers will be. When teams started making swaps after Manila, they already knew what was or wasn't working, and they had tournaments to prepare for; they also had no incentive to take their time because by changing rosters, they would already be breaking lock rules. None of those factors hold true here, so the current shuffle will likely continue for weeks.

One thing is clear: if history is any guide, it'd be surprising if the world's notable teams went unchanged.

Ryan "Gorgon the Wonder Cow" Jurado writes about Dota 2 and freelances for theScore esports. You can follow him on Twitter.


Game Dota2 TnC Pro Team discuss roster exodus, will form new roster

Game Dota2 TnC Pro Team discuss roster exodus, will form new roster

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Dota is the Ayn Rand of esports. Compared to CS:GO or League of Legends, it can be brutally Darwinistic; in other titles, teams that fall short of a top international finish can survive on sticker sales or salaries while they improve, but in Dota, every player’s survival depends exclusively on their team's performance, with little room for error.

The first-or-last mentality this promotes puts immense pressure on players to find every advantage. For some it can be a source of motivation, but there’s no question it also puts a strain on relationships between teammates. When push comes to shove, a player’s own survival comes before that of their team. As Arteezy said on stream in January of last year, "You have to be selfish in what you do to be successful. If that means breaking friendships, or potentially breaking friendships or f***ing up people to get what you want, it's worth it. It's a depressing reality, but you got to do what you got to do." That stream was later deleted.

Since the very beginning, The International has been a the creator and the destroyer, suturing players together on the inhale and blowing apart the global competitive scene on the exhale. After The International 2011, esports’ first million-dollar event, all but two teams had major roster changes, and that pattern has continued in every year since.

That said, the nature of shuffles changed drastically this 2016 season. TI’s ever-growing prize pool and Valve's roster locks weigh heavily on teams, and there's good reason to believe that many of them will fracture in the coming weeks.

Shuffles of the Past

Back in 2011, the post-TI roster shuffle was spread out over the fall season, but as the years have progressed, the period of breakup and reformation has become shorter and more immediate. Valve made this trend an official policy last year when they introduced the Major roster lock system, which gave teams approximately one month after TI to figure things out before they had to sign up for the next Major.

Early on, teams tended to disband completely after mixed results at The International. Seven rosters disbanded after TI1, and the same number disbanded the next year. In 2013, both The International and third-party tournament earnings spiked thanks to the introduction of crowdfunding. At that year's TI, half the rosters attending broke up in the aftermath. In spite of how popular disbanding was, players still tended to cling to past teammates; by early 2014, NewBee had risen from the ashes of TongFu, Titan from the ashes of Orange, and many other players from disbanding teams were joining squads with one or two players they'd played alongside in the past.

Today, by contrast, organizations have become much more stable, and drafting players has become increasingly important. Rather than disband altogether, teams have tended to swap out the majority of their players and build new rosters around one or two defining stars. Meanwhile, players on major teams have had more incentive to stay until they get a better offer, and the growing prevalence of long-term contracts has made transfers more difficult.

Saahil "Universe" Arora was a focus of the spring 2016 shuffle

The International 2014 was the first year where nearly every roster at The International had players change, at least two per team by Spring of the following year. Although this was the first year of true worldwide roster instability, it was also the year with the fewest fully disbanded teams — especially considering four of the six disbanding teams were qualified rather than invited, and three of those had only been sponsored because they had qualified.

In 2015, the trend continued. Evil Geniuses became the first team to kick a player after winning The International — the first team to kick a player after winning any major Dota 2 tournament, in fact. That paved the way for Team Secret to swap out two of their players after convincingly winning The Shanghai Major. Now, after TI6, it’s not clear that anyone is safe; Fnatic, who finished a comfortable Top 4, have already lost one of their players, and all eyes are on second-place finisher Digital Chaos, a small-time NA team suddenly full of desirable star players.

Perspectives on Change

There are two competing priorities in professional Dota: stability and adaptation. Different philosophies have developed around each. According to the latter, it's important for players to be exposed to fresh perspectives and different approaches to the game, and this is most often accomplished by bringing in new team members.

The trepidation is that a team that stays together too long will get stale and fall behind an ever-shifting metagame; that the players will get comfortable and even lazy without the need to constantly prove themselves. This perspective finds evidence in teams like Alliance, who stagnated after winning TI3 but returned to increased success after its players split up for a season and came back with fresh insight on the game.

Yet, from the viewpoint of stability, constantly changing a squad gives the players no time to become comfortable with each other's play habits, and robs them of the chance to develop synergy and improve over time. And this season at least, stability seems to have paid out much larger dividends than adaptation. Wings Gaming have been the most stable team in China over the course of their ascent to become TI’s champions this year. OG and Liquid have had the most stable rosters in Europe since TI5, and although those teams didn't fare particularly well at TI6, OG won two Majors and Liquid placed in the Top 2 at Shanghai and Manila.

Wings Gaming at The Manila Major

The introduction of coaches, substitutes and data analysts is one way these teams have been able to infuse fresh perspectives without changing rosters — for example, OG hired Sébastien "7ckingMad" Debs to help them reinvigorate their game after a downturn last winter. Meanwhile, teams that tried to solve their problems by shaking up their rosters, like Team Secret or Vici Gaming, have often struggled to find success.

At The International, I discussed the issue of stability with as many players and coaches as would discuss it, and no two had the same perspective. Escape Gaming coach Benjamin "Notahax" Läärä told me that if a roster can't commit to playing together for at least six months, there's no point in playing together at all. OG's captain Tal "Fly" Aizik said, "If people are not going to be motivated, they're not going to set a new goal for themselves, you're going to get worse. It's just how it is.” He later added, "It's very important to look at a goal and have that in mind."

RELATED: Fly on maintaining OG's winning mentality: '[We] can't afford to be not as hungry as the other teams'

Though there are only two Majors expected in the 2016-17 season, it is not known when and how long rosters will be locked next year. Given the instability that shook up the scene in the middle of the six-month lock that bridged The Manila Major and TI6 this year, it’s no longer clear that Valve will be able to enforce its roster locks as The International 2017 approaches.

Kurtis "Aui_2000" Ling told the Defense of the Patience podcast that after his experiences with Digital Chaos, he thinks teams are better off risking the open qualifiers than committing to a roster of uncertain quality too fast. From the perspective of Evil Geniuses — who despite breaking the Manila roster lock finished third at TI and went home with $2.2 million — it’s hard to argue that shuffling their roster and facing the open qualifiers was a bad choice. If this year showed us anything, it’s that roster locks that are too long or too rigid can end up increasing instability in the scene rather than ensuring it.

The Pending Shuffle

That lands us in the here and now. With Valve’s new roster lock policy, which breaks up the fall registration deadline into two separate “drop” and “add” dates, teams have more freedom to make necessary changes ahead of the Major. The new rules should play more into teams’ natural roster patterns.

Jacky "EternalEnvy" Mao was one of the first casualties of the post-TI6 shuffle

Between 2012 and 2015, several seasonal shuffles have developed on their own as teams have followed the rhythm of tournament trial and error. There’s a fall shuffle after The International, followed by a minor shuffle for underperforming teams between November and December. A second major shuffle usually occurs worldwide in January and February, with another fine-tuning shuffle between March and April. Teams have tended to stop tuning their rosters in the late Spring, when TI invites go out.

The roster lock system tried to shove all of that into a few frenzied weeks a few times a year, making squads commit before playing events with each other. The new two-Major system may still do this, but at least two Majors instead of three will align Valve’s roster locks more closely with the natural “off-season” periods in the fall and new year. It may decrease the likelihood of a messy post-lock Spring shuffle like we saw this year.

Rumors of the post-TI6 shuffle were already flying before the event ended. We knew contracts would expire for MVP Phoenix. We’ve seen key players like Secret’s EternalEnvy, Fnatic’s DJ and LGD’s Aggressif dropped from rosters on the new version of Valve’s registration page, though there's only speculation as to where they’re going. Many of SEA’s top teams, including TI Top 6 finisher TNC Gaming, have already dissolved. We’ve heard speculation that Alliance, OG and Liquid will all be joining the shuffle, and that China will see a repeat of the post-Shanghai shakeup as major players take the opportunity to retire.

RELATED: Hao's departure signals a changing of the guard for China​

The pressure on teams hasn't yet hit full-tilt. Though TI6 is fading in the distance, Valve has only just announced its new registration rules, and we don’t yet know when the fall Major or qualifiers will be. When teams started making swaps after Manila, they already knew what was or wasn't working, and they had tournaments to prepare for; they also had no incentive to take their time because by changing rosters, they would already be breaking lock rules. None of those factors hold true here, so the current shuffle will likely continue for weeks.

One thing is clear: if history is any guide, it'd be surprising if the world's notable teams went unchanged.

Ryan "Gorgon the Wonder Cow" Jurado writes about Dota 2 and freelances for theScore esports. You can follow him on Twitter.


Gaming WATCH: First gameplay trailer revealed for Vampyr from the makers of Life Is Strange

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WATCH: First gameplay trailer revealed for Vampyr from the makers of Life Is Strange
Vampyr is set in London in 1918 (Picture: Dontnod)

A 15-minute gameplay trailer has been revealed for Dontnod’s follow-up to Life Is Strange, titled Vampyr.

The studio’s next game takes a slight deviation from the high school setting and time-bending mechanics of Life Is Strange, opting for an action role-player revolving around vampire doctor Jonathan Reid, as he slowly comes to terms with his bloodthirsty condition.

Set during 1918 in London, the trailer shows off some of the character decisions you’ll encounter, as well as the bloody battle mechanics which might have you yearning for Castlevania.

However, if you have any heart-busting concerns following the footage the makers are keen to stress this is ‘pre-alpha’ footage, with many aspects like the combat system still early in development.

While you can certainly tell it’s early days judging by some of the character lip-synching and wonky combat, the spooky gothic environments are looking particularly impressive.

The game promises to allow players freedom to choose who dies or lives, with too many kills potentially causing disarray in a district or having a butterfly effect on other characters in the surrounding area.

Vampyr will release on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in 2017.

MORE: Dontnod’s Vampyr looks nothing like Life Is Strange MORE: Life Is Strange interview – live action web series and sequel talk
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Gaming Games Inbox: Summer video games, No Man’s Sky defence, and Titanfall 2 disappointment

Gaming Games Inbox: Summer video games, No Man’s Sky defence, and Titanfall 2 disappointment

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Games Inbox: Do you play less games in the summer?
ABZÛ – a perfect summer game?

The evening Inbox pits PlayStation Plus against Games with Gold, as one reader asks about Street Fighter V’s second season.

To join in with the discussions yourself email gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk

Not the weather for it

I’ve been enjoying reading all of GC’s Gamescom coverage, and the fact this year’s summer games drought has actually not been too bad. I was even feeling pretty optimistic about VR and the upgrade consoles, and considering getting a PlayStation VR. And then it occurred to me: I can’t actually remember the last time I played a game.

I’m bored of it now but it was probably Pokémon GO, and that’s for the obvious reason that you play it when you’re outside. You can do that with any portable of course, but it’s one of the few games where you physically have to be out and about. But beyond that? I didn’t get No Man’s Sky after seeing the reviews, so I think probably Lego Star Wars with my niece?

This isn’t one of those ‘I’m so bored of games’ letters though. Like I say, I’m feeling pretty good about them at the moment, but with the good weather I just haven’t had the time or inclination. We complain about the summer games drought but can we really blame publishers when sitting in a dark room in the sweltering heat is just about the last thing I want to do right now. Maybe I’ll try that scuba diving game though, or a gin & tonic drinking simulator…

Are there any other games that GCers turn to in the summer heat? I almost feel like I’m deserting my duty!
Petron

This Man's Sky

I know No Man’s Sky isn’t the game changer in open world sci-fi games everyone hoped it would be but I must admit I’m really enjoying it. I’m not sure how long I’ve been playing for (can you check this in-game anywhere?) but I’ve visited more than 20 planets and have not felt any need to stop just yet.

I find pootling about the often stunning landscapes, scanning new life forms and gradually upgrading my ship and equipment a relaxing change from other games. Contrary to most people, the inventory management hasn’t bothered me at all. Too often in games I find myself hoarding everything I pick up, so being forced into actually being stringent with the items I choose to keep or equip has been refreshing.

Having said all that, I can understand why some people may find the game boring but each to their own I suppose.
SuoTempore (PSN ID)
PS: Regarding the Humble PlayStation bundle, can someone confirm the codes work from a UK PSN account? According to their website they are only redeemable in the Americas.

Not the problem

The furore of No Man’s Sky is fascinating to me. For the record I have it, but am yet to play it.
I remember when the first trailer came out, and the very first line being ‘Every atom procedural’. I also remember when I pointed out that this is physically impossible, hyperbole, and false advertising I was always met with ‘You shouldn’t take it literally!’

It is therefore with a very strong sense of schadenfreude that I watch other people complaining that the game isn’t as was advertised, or at least how they felt it was advertised to them. Maybe they shouldn’t have taken the things that Shaun Murray said so literally?

I must stop writing this now, as the room is filling up with smug, and soon I won’t be able to breathe.
Joseph Dowland

GC: We don’t think anyone’s argued that the game isn’t almost entirely procedurally generated? In fact, that’s the primary reason it gets so repetitive so quickly.

E-mail your comments to: gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk

Great idea

Kimble did you forget about Uncharted 4?

No Man’s Sky sounds like it is not the first Sony exclusive that ended up being a much better idea than game, I think Gravity Rush also falls into this category and so does Heavy Rain. Personally I prefer Sony’s approach of trying a broad range of ideas even if they rarely turn into something great like The Last Of Us.

I have not played No Man’s Sky yet but intend to once it is quite a lot cheaper and/or has additional content added. I was expecting and to be honest hoping for quite a sedate game, therefore quite a few of the criticisms do not worry me. Despite its size however, the game never sounded like a £50 game.
PazJohnMitch

GC: You both forgot about Gravity Rush 2, which is out this December. The original had some flaws but we’re hopeful they can be ironed out in a sequel.

For profit

For the Players, huh, Sony? Sure, more like For the Shareholders. I’ve had my PlayStation 4 for two years now and love the console, but Sony’s decision to raise the price for PlayStation Plus feels like a kick in the teeth, especially given how well the PlayStation 4 has been doing. When I first joined PlayStation Plus it was amazing – it offered great discounts and the free games up for grabs every month were incredible compared to what Microsoft were offering. A few years on and the free games offered by PlayStation rarely interest me, and it’s now Microsoft who offer the best free games in my opinion.

I feel as though the success has made Sony apathetic toward their fans; they can do pretty much whatever they want and still be successful due to their superior product. They haven’t announced a price rise for Europe so far, but I get the feeling it’s only a matter of time.

I would love to proclaim that any price rise will lead to me abandoning Sony and making the Xbox One my primary console on principle, but I hate the Xbox One. I dislike almost everything about the Xbox One; the controller, interface and even exclusives are far inferior to the PlayStation 4 in my opinion – and the Xbox 360 is one of my favourite consoles.
iLike Fat Ladys (gamertag)

50% approval

After seeing what has been announced with September’s Games with Gold is anyone surprised that we Aare getting another Assassin’s Creed game free again? Which is Assassin’s Creed Chronicles: China on Xbox One?

This actually did surprise me as I never thought of having two Assassin’s Creed games on the same platform would go free on Games with Gold.

The other games we are getting is Earthlock: Festival Of Magic and for Xbox 360 Forza Horizon and Mirror’s Edge. I will most certainly be looking forward to at least two of these games this month.
gaz be rotten (gamertag)

Endless battle

Thanks for the Street Fighter V info; it’s a great help.

One more query: I’ve heard lots about the deluxe content being available using in-game credits and therefore not something you need to purchase. Is this correct?

Also, is there any news on further DLC?

Will you be re-reviewing it as implied in your original review. I’d be interested to know if you’d award it the 10/10 you promised…
Dunners

GC: Technically you can unlock everything in the game by just playing, but that’s going to take an awful long time. The DLC and updates are supposed to be organised into seasons, with the first one lasting through the end of this year. We’ll probably wait for season 2 and the reintroduction of Arcade mode before we re-review the game.

Catch up on every previous Games Inbox here

Sinking feeling

Thanks to my superior copying and pasting abilities I was able to procure a code for the Titanfall 2 pre-alpha from a generous Twitch streamer. As a huge fan of the original I was really looking forward to seeing the improvements, but after several hours I was left very disappointed. Titanfall is one of my favourite multiplayer games, I played the game religiously for several months after release – and only really stopped due to the dearth of active players.

I only had a few minor issues with Titanfall and was fully expecting Respawn to iron out these issues and produce a superior sequel, but my time with the Tiatnfall 2 alpha left me perplexed by some of Respawn’s design changes, and a feeling of the game being very sluggish. Pilot movement felt a lot slower than in the original, including the wall-running. The pilot shooting also felt worse – it just had a strange, sluggish feel to it and the narrower field of view felt uncomfortable.

My grievances extend to the changes made to the Titans and how you earn them. In the first game you would earn your Titan passively and any kills would expedite the procurement of your Titan, but in the sequel the only way to earn a Titan is to get kills. I feel this change can make it take too long to get into a Titan, and less skilled players may find it very difficult to actually earn a Titan. I also don’t like how susceptible Titans now feel, their survivability has certainly been lowered, making Titan encounters feel far to brief.

One of the few changes I did like was the specific abilities each Titan now has – this will introduce some much needed variety, and I’m looking forward to experimenting with each Titan. I understand it was only a pre-alpha and that the developers are already addressing the issues, but the game is out in little over two months and I’m hoping Respawn will make the necessary changes. The game doesn’t need Titanic changes (sorry), but instead many smaller ones before I’ll consider making a purchase.
iLike Fat Ladys (gamertag)

Inbox also-rans

Just though I’d mention that the Street Fighter V and Mega Man discount codes you offered to redistribute are only available when a Humble Bundle is purchased, which is for charity. Anyone that wants these discount codes only has to spend a few notes on a Humble Bundle. I thought GC’s stance was that this was on ethically shaky grounds.
Chaosphere616

GC: Oh, we didn’t realise they were from Humble Bundle as well. But yes, we do discourage sharing those.

RE: Duke Nukem 3D. I must have played through that game about 1,000 times. but if a remake/remaster is on the way then it is a day one purchase! Love that game.
Simon

This week’s Hot Topic

Now that Gamescom is over, we know almost everything we’re going to know in advance about this year’s winter line-up. So the question for this weekend’s Inbox is simple: which game are you looking forward to the most?

There’s a list of the more prominent titles here, but feel free to suggest any game you like – as long as it’s released in the UK between now and the end of the year. But don’t just make it a list of games; explain to us why you’re looking forward to each title and what exactly you expect of it.

Will you be buying the games straight away, or waiting for them to be discounted at a later date? When did you first become interested in them and will you pre-order them? And do you think this year’s Christmas is better or worse than usual?

E-mail your comments to: gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk

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New Inbox updates appear twice daily, every weekday morning and afternoon. Letters are used on merit and may be edited for length.

You can also submit your own 500 to 600-word 4Player viewer features at any time, which if used will be shown in the next available weekend slot.

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